Posts Taged women-in-stem

DISH Celebrates International Women’s Day

Contributor: Maddie Yerant, DISH Corporate Communications

March 8 marks an exciting day for women and allies across the world—International Women’s Day (IWD). Adopted in 1975 by the United Nations, this annual celebration recognizes women around the globe, their successes and accomplishments, and the bright future lying ahead.

Established in America in 1909, IWD now symbolizes a broad, encompassing movement as it’s celebrated by women and allies on every point on the political spectrum.

This year, as more women took office this January than ever before, you might have already seen celebrations taking place. Female lawmakers on both sides of the aisle wore white to the 2019 State of the Union to symbolize their record-breaking numbers and to promote a message of solidarity.

Founded in 2015, the DISH Women’s Network (DWN) was created to provide women at DISH an environment to foster relationships and professional growth through networking, education and career development. Our goal is to empower women to become leaders and create an inclusive work environment.

If you’re interested in joining the DWN, or simply want to learn more, today is a great day to do so—please feel free to visit us online at dishwomensnetwork.com, find us on Instagram … Read more and comment

Pioneering African American Women in Tech

As part of Black History Month, we want to highlight some of the pioneering women in tech who made history with their achievements.

Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden were four pioneering black women who achieved the seemingly impossible through their vision, actions and hard work. They worked in the segregated town of Hampton, Virginia to help offload the massive amounts of aeronautical research needed to win the war. As Americans fought for victory in World War II, and the Space Race, these brilliant mathematicians worked quietly behind the scenes as “human computers.” Recruited by NASA and featured in the award-winning film; Hidden Figures, they also helped put a man on the moon.

In 2017 we had the honor of hosting one of these brave women, Christine Mann Darden D. Sc., as a speaker on our DWN Leader Series. She shared her wisdom and insights with us, including some practical tips for success.

Christine Darden’s 5 P’s for success:

  1. Perceive yourself in your dream job.
  2. Plan: What courses and background do you need to achieve it?
  3. Prepare: Work your plan.
  4. Persist through all the detours.
  5. Project: Is it a job that is growing or dying? Is this
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Barbies in STEM? Female Filmmakers? Major changes at major institutions

By: Kathryn Rainville

This year has marked the advent of a new generation of women speaking up and stepping out. Two major players in the way of female influence from a young age (Mattel and Disney) are making strides to empower women.

First up: Mattel. What was your favorite Barbie doll when you were young? Did you ever think about her career, and did you ever envy it? I certainly thought about it, but I can’t say that I ever understood what, exactly, my Barbie did other than wear pretty clothes and go to the beach in her Jeep. However, this year, Mattel released a Robotics Engineer of their world-famous doll, one that they hope will promote young girls to explore STEM. Although the original Barbie isn’t going away, Mattel views the release of this Barbie as “…a powerful opportunity for kids across the globe” to become more exposed to the STEM fields and still play with a Barbie (McCowan). In fact, they have leveraged an online platform in conjunction with each sale of a Robotics Engineer Barbie to give girls the opportunity “…to learn basic programming concepts at a young age” through their partnership with Tynker (McCowan). Mattel has Read more and comment

6 Key Traits Women in STEM Possess

By: Kathryn Rainville

What happens once women are in the workplace? Harvard Business Review recently published 6 key tenants that successful women in STEM have in common. They are:

  1. Telegraph confidence

A recent study cited in the article states “…that fewer than 2 in 10 women in STEM who have not achieved success report being extremely confident in their abilities,” even if they are perfectly capable and excel in their field. This confidence is everything for women in STEM, and of those who have achieved success, “…39% report such confidence” (Sherbin)

2.  Claim credit for your ideas

We hear it all the time, but based on a study cited in this article, “…82% of women in STEM say their contributions are ignored” (Sherbin). However, women who are successful in STEM boast a 14% higher likelihood of speaking up upon being overlooked. Dr. Velma Deleveaux shares her method of reclaiming her own ideas, in which she confronts the person who attempts to claim her idea and says “I’m so glad you agree with the idea I introduced earlier. Let me share some additional thoughts.” It’s important to stand up for yourself and your ideas, and this is one easy way to … Read more and comment