Posts Taged women-in-stem

Barbies in STEM? Female Filmmakers? Major changes at major institutions

By: Kathryn Rainville

This year has marked the advent of a new generation of women speaking up and stepping out. Two major players in the way of female influence from a young age (Mattel and Disney) are making strides to empower women.

First up: Mattel. What was your favorite Barbie doll when you were young? Did you ever think about her career, and did you ever envy it? I certainly thought about it, but I can’t say that I ever understood what, exactly, my Barbie did other than wear pretty clothes and go to the beach in her Jeep. However, this year, Mattel released a Robotics Engineer of their world-famous doll, one that they hope will promote young girls to explore STEM. Although the original Barbie isn’t going away, Mattel views the release of this Barbie as “…a powerful opportunity for kids across the globe” to become more exposed to the STEM fields and still play with a Barbie (McCowan). In fact, they have leveraged an online platform in conjunction with each sale of a Robotics Engineer Barbie to give girls the opportunity “…to learn basic programming concepts at a young age” through their partnership with Tynker (McCowan). Mattel has Read more and comment

6 Key Traits Women in STEM Possess

By: Kathryn Rainville

What happens once women are in the workplace? Harvard Business Review recently published 6 key tenants that successful women in STEM have in common. They are:

  1. Telegraph confidence

A recent study cited in the article states “…that fewer than 2 in 10 women in STEM who have not achieved success report being extremely confident in their abilities,” even if they are perfectly capable and excel in their field. This confidence is everything for women in STEM, and of those who have achieved success, “…39% report such confidence” (Sherbin)

2.  Claim credit for your ideas

We hear it all the time, but based on a study cited in this article, “…82% of women in STEM say their contributions are ignored” (Sherbin). However, women who are successful in STEM boast a 14% higher likelihood of speaking up upon being overlooked. Dr. Velma Deleveaux shares her method of reclaiming her own ideas, in which she confronts the person who attempts to claim her idea and says “I’m so glad you agree with the idea I introduced earlier. Let me share some additional thoughts.” It’s important to stand up for yourself and your ideas, and this is one easy way to … Read more and comment